Narrative
#page-content .collapsible-block { 
    position: relative;
    padding: 0.5em;
    margin: 0.5em;
    box-shadow: 2px 1.5px 1px rgba(176,16,0,0.7), 0 0 0px 1px lightgrey;
    overflow-wrap: break-word;
}
 
.collapsible-block-unfolded{
    color: black;
    overflow-wrap: break-word;
 
}
 
.collapsible-block-unfolded-link {
    text-align:center;
}
 
.collapsible-block-folded {
    text-align: center;
    color: dimgrey;
}
 
.collapsible-block-link {
    font-weight: bold;
    color: dimgrey;
    text-align: center;
}
 
.addendumbox {
    padding: .01em 16px;
    margin-bottom: 16px;
    margin-top: 16px;
    padding-bottom: 1em;
    box-shadow:0 2px 5px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.16),0 2px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.12);
}
 
.material-box {
    padding: .01em 16px;
    margin-bottom: 16px;
    margin-top: 16px;
    padding-bottom: 1em;
    border: 1px lightgrey solid;
    box-shadow: 1px 2px 2px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.16);
}
 
.material-box blockquote {
    border: 1px double #999;
}
 
.wiki-content-table {
    width: 100%;
}
 
.addendumbox blockquote {
    border: 1px double #999;
}
 
.addendumtitle {
   opacity: 0.8;
   margin-bottom: 10px;
   color: #b01;
}
 
.maintitle {
   margin-bottom: 10px;
   color: black;
}
 
.scp-header {
    text-align: center;
    font-size:x-large;
    color:#b01;
}
 
.addenda-header {
    width: 100%;
    border-bottom: 2px black solid;
    color: black;
}
 
.scp-info {
    display:flex;
    justify-content:space-between;
    font-size:large;
}
 
.scp-info-box {
    display:flex; 
    justify-content:space-between;
}
 
.object-info {
    color:black;
    align-self: flex-end;
    font-size: large;
}
 
.title-style {
    opacity: 0.8;
    margin-bottom: 10px;
    color: #b01;
    font-size: large;
    text-decoration: underline;
    font-weight: bold;
}
 
.update-div-empty {
    text-align: right;
    font-size: x-small;
    color: lightgrey;
}
 
.update-div {
    text-align: right;
    font-size: x-small;
}
 
.computed {
    border: 1px black solid;
    width: 50%;
    display: inline-block;
text-align: left;
    padding: 3px;
}
.computed:before {
    content:"Computed Code";
    font-weight: bold;
border-bottom: solid 1px black;
width: 100%;
}
.rawcode {
    border: black solid 1px;
    width: 50%;
    display: inline-block;
text-align: left;
    padding: 3px;
}
.rawcode:before{
    content:"Raw Code";
    text-align: center;
    font-weight: bold;
border-bottom: solid 1px black;
width: 100%;
}
.codebox {
    display: inline-block;
    width: 100%;
    text-align: center;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav .selected a em,  .yui-navset .yui-nav a em{
        padding: 0.25em .75em; 
        top: 0px;
        margin-bottom: 0px;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav .selected a {
     background: gray;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav .selected {
       margin: 0px;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav .selected a, .yui-navset .yui-nav .selected a:focus, .yui-navset .yui-nav .selected a:hover, .yui-navset .yui-nav .selected a {
         background: gray;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav a:hover,
.yui-navset .yui-nav a:focus {
    background: gainsboro;
    text-decoration: none;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav a, .yui-navset .yui-navset-top .yui-nav a {
background-color: none;
background-image: none;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav a {
background: none;
}
.yui-navset .yui-nav li{
margin: 0px;
}
 
#page-content .licensebox22 .collapsible-block {
    position: unset;
    padding: unset;
    margin: unset;
    box-shadow: unset;
}
 
.licensebox22 .collapsible-block-unfolded{
    color: inherit;
}
 
.licensebox22 .collapsible-block-unfolded-link {
    text-align: left;
}
 
.licensebox22 .collapsible-block-folded {
    text-align: left;
    color: inherit;
}
 
.licensebox22 .collapsible-block-link {
    color: inherit;
    text-align: left;
}
rating: 0+x
blank.png




Narratives.

That three-syllable word you see seasoned authors throw at your ideas thread. It's even a required part of your idea thread but what exactly does a narrative entail? How do you write a narrative? Why is this required for my ideas forum post?

This guide will attempt to help you, my dear author, answer those questions and formulate a narrative for your first, second, or even last SCP article you write.

Let's begin.


What is Narrative?


Nar·ra·tive
noun

A spoken or written account of connected events; a story.

This is the dictionary definition provided by Google.

Yes, the narrative of your SCP will be the story you tell within the article. If we look at literature, such as the Harry Potter series, each entry into the series follows a narrative within every book all culminating to one grand story by the end.

Stand-alone books such as Animal Farm follow a group of characters on their narrative journey which concludes by the end of the book.

The narrative is what you want to deliver to your audience. It's the thoughts and questions you want to leave them with when they finish your written work. It's the feelings they get while reading and after concluding. I may go as far as saying that a narrative (or lack thereof) will make or break your SCP.


Narratives in Series 1 SCPs



Many new authors will have begun their time on the wiki with reading the classics, I parse the draft and ideas forum from time to time and the main sources of inspiration I see are from the following:
SCP-173
SCP-106
SCP-096
SCP-682

So, you may read these and ask "Hey there's no narrative in those articles! Why can't I write my SCPs like these?"

I disagree. Let's dive into SCP-173.

SCP-173


We start with Containment Procedures (or ConProcs for brevity's sake.)

Item SCP-173 is to be kept in a locked container at all times. When personnel must enter SCP-173's container, no fewer than 3 may enter at any time and the door is to be relocked behind them.

Right here is a set up for our narrative. I ask myself "Why 'no fewer than 3?'" The rest of the article's narrative is used for answering this question.

Moved to Site-19 1993. Origin is as of yet unknown.

With this being the first-ever SCP article, let's pretend that we know nothing of the rest of the wiki for the rest of this exercise.

Another few mysteries, what's Site-19? Where is that? Why was SCP-173 moved there? What is this thing's origin?cThe narrative is becoming more mysterious causing me to want to read more.

SCP-173 is animate and extremely hostile. The object cannot move while within a direct line of sight. Line of sight must not be broken at any time with SCP-173. Personnel assigned to enter container are instructed to alert one another before blinking. Object is reported to attack by snapping the neck at the base of the skull, or by strangulation. In the event of an attack, personnel are to observe Class 4 hazardous object containment procedures.

And there we go, an answer to the question posed in our ConProcs.

The reddish brown substance on the floor is a combination of feces and blood. Origin of these materials is unknown. The enclosure must be cleaned on a bi-weekly basis.

Another mystery, where does this substance come from? The article concludes.

So what was the narrative? The narrative is about SCP-173's anomalous properties, its danger, the mystery of the SCP Foundation, Site-19, and its origin.

Are these questions fully answered? No. That is not a bad thing, because the mystery that SCP-173 set up caused the first readers to begin writing for the wiki.

So as you can see, SCP-173, in fact, does have narrative threads that it pulls on. Though it is nowhere near as complex as narratives we see today, it serves as a good entry into mystery and horror narratives.


Narratives in Later SCPs



Let's look at some more recent and/or complex articles. If you haven't, you should read all of these to get the context of my points

SCP-1730 by djkaktusdjkaktus
SCP-1730 is a mystery/action story following multiple Mobile Task Forces in their attempts to figure out what happened to Site-13.

This article tells asks and answers the question of 'What Happened to Site-13?' This question is posed and answered in the exploration logs, recovered materials, and concluding interview logs. This article may look complex upon first glance, but to boil it down we have a few exploration logs into an anomalous facility where we uncover the creatures residing within it. Then we are given the twist that there are still humans in the facility, which the MTFs are tasked with rescuing.


SCP-5430 by A Random DayA Random Day
This article is a good example of low-key, engaging narrative storytelling. This SCP is 420 words long and tells the story of a snake with 128 legs who likes to dance. How is this done?

We are given a basic description of the entity followed by a short discovery log and the add on of "The anomaly was found pursuing rabbits on the western side of the park and restrained with minimal difficulty."

The next paragraphs give us the entity's origin, that being created by a thaumaturge, or someone with magical powers. We're then given another cute add on: "SCP-5430 ignored McBraddock and chose to walk laps around the pond after catching and eating several rabbits."

Finally, the article concludes with a short paragraph about 5430, stating that it likes to dance and that it will be provided with music during its basking hours. So, why does this article succeed narratively? First off, the tone allows us to realize that this is a light-hearted, cute anomaly. The tone is definitely seen in the sentences I pointed out. It also succeeds because it tells a full story, being the origin of the entity and its behavior and how the Foundation contains it.


SCP-5000 by TanhonyTanhony
The winner of the 5000 contest and one of the best examples of a narrative.

We're given the anomalous item, the exclusion suit, and the body of Pietro Wilson.

The narrative is pretty straight forward here. Journal entries and logs made by Wilson about his journey to SCP-579 while the world ends behind him.

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License