Stormbreath-VII

Item #: AO-701-4028
Date of Recovery: 04-21-1976
Location of Recovery: ████ ███████
Current Status: Stored alongside SCP-701 materials at Storage Site-██
Item Description (Full): Thirty copies of the AO-701-4028 were recovered from ████ ███████ High School in 1976 alongside the following objects of note:

  • One 1971 hardcover printing edition of SCP-701, West Virginia Deviation.
  • One apparent copy of The History of Cardenio, a lost work of Shakespeare, inspired by Miguel de Cervantes' Don Quixote. Copy is an active vector for SCP-4028. Veracity of the work as the accurate History of Cardenio is questionable but appears accurate. Play is similar to original Cardenio episode and Double Falsehood1
  • The scripts and scores for multiple operas and Broadway musicals.
  • One copy of a book on loan from the Wanderer's Library, detailing pataphysical entities and how to interact with them.

Students at ████ ███████ High School were apparently attempting to enact a performance of AO-701-4028 as a play, but the attempt was discovered three weeks prior to the initial performance, as a result of publicity surrounding the alleged recovery of the History of Cardenio. Foundation agents were deployed, all instances of AO-701-4028 were confiscated, and a cover story disputing the authenticity of the recovered History of Cardenio was disseminated.

AO-701-4028 is a fusion of the plot of the Hanged King's Tragedy and the History of Cardenio and is titled the Hanged King's History. Unlike the previous two works, the Hanged King's History is a musical, although the dialogue is inspired by Shakespeare. This was evidently generated through pataphysical interaction over the medium of an unidentified Broadway musical.

Brief summaries of the plots of the Hanged King's Tragedy, the History of Cardenio and the Hanged King's History follows.

The Hanged King's Tragedy
yada

The History of Cardenio
The play begins framing device featuring Don Quixote and Sancho Panza encountering Cardenio, a disgraced noble. He then tells them a story …

The Hanged King's History
The Hanged King's History conflates many of the characters of the two constituent plays, combining them to form a single, barely coherent narrative. Antonio and Cardenio are combined into a single character (Antonio is the name he was given at birth, and Cardenio the name he was raised by, unaware of his royal heritage), as are Luscinda and Alinda (named Luscalinda) and Don Fernando and Gonzalo (named Don Gonzalo).

The play opens with Don Quixote and Sancho Panza traveling on an adventure when they encounter a disheveled and frightened man. They convince the man to tell him why is concerned, and the man begins to tell a story (Pray Tell, What Fear is This?)

Upon learning that the wedding of Don Gonzalo and Luscalinda has not yet occurred, Don Quixote interrupts the framing device to announce that they must stop the events in question (What measure is a Hero?). Antonio protests the ability of Don Quixote to help, but is assured that Don Quixote is a knight who will be easily able to defeat Don Gonzalo.

Don Quixote, Sancho Panza and Antonio travel to the palace and disrupt the wedding, much to the ire of Don Gonzalo. (Knave!) SCP-701-1 appears on stage at this point (referred to as GILGALI, THE TIGER WITH LANTERN EYES2) and attempts to engage Don Quixote. The battle goes uncharacteristically well for Don Quixote, who defeats SCP-701-1 following a soliloquy on the nature of courage (Cowards and Vile Creatures).

The following is the entirety of the last scene of the play, deemed to be the most important as a result of the presence of the two pataphysical entities contained within.

THE HANGED KING'S HISTORY

ACT 5

SCENE 2

Characters: DON QUIXOTE, SANCHO PANZA, ANTONIO, DON GONZALO, LUSCALINDA, DOROBELLA, FRANCISCO, THE AMBASSADOR OF MILAN, THE AMBASSADOR OF FLORENCE, THE AMBASSADOR OF ALAGADDA, GILGALI THE TIGER WITH LANTERN EYES, CHORUS


Don Quixote: Knave!

Don Gonzalo: Who might you be, intruder?

Don Quixote: My name is Don Quixote, and I am a knight!

Antonio: Usurper! I am the rightful king of this throne, and Luscalinda is my bride!


they fight

Gilgali, the Tiger with Lantern Eyes enters stage left.

Gilgali: Woe be to those that break the story,
and you be one. Begone, begone, begone!
The play continues, we dance upon the strings.

it's unrealistic that don quixote is able to beat the shit out of the hanged king? well, the hanged king is the fear of the unknown, you see…

and is don quixote afraid of anything?

Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License